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Posts for: July, 2018

July 19, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Cuts from a sharp knife or a piece of glass are very common. They often occur while people are preparing food, washing dishes, or even crafting. All it takes is a slip of the knife or a dish breaking, and suddenly there’s blood. However, while these types of cuts are startling, most can be safety treated at home.

To treat a minor cut, dermatologists recommend the following tips:

  1. Wash your hands with soap and water.

  2. Wash the cut to prevent infection. Use cool or lukewarm water and a mild soap or cleanser to gently remove dirt or debris.

  3. Stop the bleeding. Apply pressure to the cut using a clean washcloth or gauze. Maintain pressure for one to two minutes or until the bleeding stops.

  4. Apply petroleum jelly. This will help keep the wound moist for faster healing. Make sure you apply it continuously until the cut heals. To help prevent the spread of dirt and bacteria, consider using petroleum jelly from a tube instead of a jar. Do not apply topical antibiotics.

  5. Cover the cut with a sterile bandage. This will help protect the cut and prevent it from reopening. Change the bandage daily, and keep the cut covered until it heals.

  6. Consider taking over-the-counter pain medication. Acetaminophen can help relieve painful cuts.

  7. Make sure your tetanus vaccination is up to date if your cut is from a dirty or rusty object. If you aren’t sure, contact your primary care doctor.

Most minor cuts heal in one week or less; however, if your cut is longer than three-fourths of an inch, more than a quarter inch deep, or won’t stop bleeding, seek immediate medical attention.

As your cut heals, if you notice any signs of an infection, such as pus or increased redness, swelling or pain, call your primary care doctor or a board-certified dermatologist.


By Dr. Patricia McCormack, M.D., F.A.A.D.
July 16, 2018
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Acne   Acne Treatment  

Acne is one of the most common and yet one of the most challenging skin problems people face. We know how frustrating it can be to try one over-the-counter acne product after another, thinking you are giving your skin everything it needs to combat acne and then suddenly the acne returns. What’s going on? If you find yourself struggling to find the perfect formula and treatment options for getting clearer skin a dermatologist will be able to help.

From children to teens to adults, anyone can develop acne. Of course, when we think about acne we do often think about those adolescent years; however, dermatologists also see a lot of adults that are still dealing with different forms of acne. When you come in for a skincare consultation a skin doctor will perform a thorough physical exam. From there we may ask you a series of questions regarding your skin care regime, lifestyle and habits, as this will provide some insight into what could be triggering your acne symptoms.

After your consultation is complete we will create a customized treatment plan that will cater to addressing the source of your acne symptoms; fortunately, today there are so many different treatment options out there. A dermatologist will most often recommend different strategies for handling your acne. These options may include,

Treatments that you place directly on your skin

Many of your acne treatments can be applied right on your skin to reduce both acne-causing bacteria and oil. Popular topical acne medications often contain salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide or retinoids. Your dermatologist will determine the topical treatment that will work best for your skin.

Treatment that is systemic and works throughout the body

Sometimes it’s necessary to systemically treat acne, particularly if it’s causing serious redness or swelling. By taking pills such as antibiotics, birth control pills or isotretinoin (the best course of action for severe acne), we can reduce both of these symptoms while also preventing acne breakouts.

Different dermatological treatments that can reduce or even get rid of acne

There are also some in-office treatment options available from your skin doctor that can help eliminate acne-causing bacteria and even get rid of blackheads and whiteheads. These common procedures include:

  • Laser or light therapy

  • Chemical peels

  • Extractions

  • Dermabrasion (to reduce the appearance of superficial acne scars)

Know that you aren’t alone when it comes to treating acne and a dermatologist can help you get your skin clearer. It’s important to be patient when it comes to acne treatment, as it can take several weeks to see results. Talk to a dermatologist today about how they can help you.


By Dr. Patricia McCormack, M.D., F.A.A.D.
July 03, 2018
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Cold sores  

Cold Sores can appear on the outside of the lipWhat are cold sores and what can you do to relieve your symptoms?

Most people who have had cold sores often know when they are about to appear. The tingling and burning sensation around the mouth is often the first indicator that a cold sore is imminent. Approximately 80 to 90 percent of Americans have been exposed to the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV­1), which causes cold sores. If you have cold sores then you are probably wondering more about this condition, how to treat it and what it means for your health.

What are the symptoms of cold sores?

Symptoms often stick around for about two to three weeks. Besides experiencing oral sores around the mouth, people may also experience flu­like symptoms such as fever, muscle aches and fatigue. These oral sores will often appear as tiny blisters that break open and scab over.

When should I see a doctor about cold sores?

While cold sores often don’t warrant a trip to the dermatologist, there are certain times when it might be advisable. These sores can be painful, so if you find it difficult to eat or talk then you will want to talk to your doctor about the best ways to alleviate the pain to make eating easier. The last thing you want to deal with is dehydration on top of an outbreak.

If these oral sores look different from other cold sore outbreaks, then it’s also worth seeing your dermatologist to receive a proper diagnosis. Those with weakened immune systems due to chronic illness or chemotherapy should also see their dermatologist to prevent further complications.

What treatments are available for cold sores?

While many cold sores will go away without the need for treatment, if you are experiencing pain we may prescribe a topical anesthetic to reduce your discomfort. There are also over­the-counter treatments that speed up healing and reduce pain. However, for those with severe infections your dermatologist may also prescribe an oral antiviral medication.

Those with weak immune systems and those who become dehydrated as a result of cold sores may need to go to the hospital to prevent further problems and to receive oral antivirals.

While you cannot cure the virus that causes cold sores, there are certainly ways to reduce your symptoms. Talk to your dermatologist to find out more!